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Oct 19: FROM FIELD TO STAGE TO SCREEN: Aesthetic Methodologies in the Making of Sweet Tea



e patrick johnsonFrom Field to Stage to Screen: Aesthetic Methodologies in the Making of Sweet Tea

a lecture by E. Patrick Johnson

October 19, Thursday
12 to 1:30 pm

E. Patrick Johnson, African American Studies, Northwestern University

Drawing on his research on black queers of the South, Johnson will discuss how he adapted oral history narratives and field research to a stage play and then to a documentary film. The lecture will also engage questions of ethics, advocacy and aesthetics.

Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality
285 Mercer Street, 4th Floor

E. Patrick Johnson has published widely in the areas of race, class, gender, sexuality, and performance. He is the founder and director of the Black Arts Initiative at Northwestern. He is also a Project& artist, a nonprofit arts organization engaged in art for social change and impact. Johnson is a prolific performer and scholar, and an inspiring teacher, whose research and artistry has greatly impacted African American studies, performance studies, and sexuality studies. He is the author of two award-winning books, Appropriating Blackness:  Performance and the Politics of Authenticity, and Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South—An Oral History. He is the editor of Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis by Dwight Conquergood (Michigan UP, 2013) and co-editor (with Mae G. Henderson) of Black Queer Studies—A Critical Anthology and (with Ramon Rivera-Servera) of solo/black/woman: scripts, interviews, and essays and Blacktino Queer Performance (Duke UP, forthcoming). He is currently at work on the companion text to Sweet Tea, entitled, Honeypot: Southern Black Women Who Love Women and an edited collection of new writings in black queer studies tentatively titled, No Tea, No Shade: New Writings in Black Queer Studies.

Facebook event page here.

This event is free & open to the public. Venue is accessible. For more information, please contact NYU CSGS at csgs(at)nyu.edu or 212-992-9540.



Nov 20: LISTENING TO IMAGES, Tina Campt



tina camptListening to Images

a Decolonizing Vision Speaker Series lecture by Tina Campt

November 20, Monday
6 to 8 pm

Tina Campt, Africana and Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies, Barnard College

Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality
285 Mercer Street, 4th Floor

This event is free & open to the public. Venue is accessible. For more information, please contact NYU CSGS at csgs(at)nyu.edu or 212-992-9540.

Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality and Program in Africana Studies.



Nov 17: ALL THE WEIGHT OF OUR DREAMS: On Living Racialized Autism



lydia xz brownAll the Weight of Our Dreams: On Living Racialized Autism

a talk with Lydia X. Z. Brown & Sunny Taylor

November 17, Friday
4 to 6 pm

Lydia X. Z. Brown, Visiting Lecturer, Tufts University

Lydia X. Z. Brown is a gender/queer and transracially/transnationally adopted East Asian autistic activist, writer, and speaker who disrupts institutional complacency everywhere from the academy to state agencies and the nonprofit-industrial complex. In collaboration with E. Ashkenazy and Morénike Giwa Onaiwu, Lydia is the lead editor and visionary behind All the Weight of Our Dreams, a new anthology of by autistic people of color.

Social & Cultural Analysis
20 Cooper Square, 4th Floor

Co-sponsored by the NYU Asian/Pacific/American Institute; Center for Disability Studies; Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality; Department of Anthropology; and Department of Social & Cultural Analysis.



Nov 15: COMBAHEE RIVER COLLECTIVE: Black Feminist Sonic Dissent Then & Now



CombaheeCombahee River Collective Mixtape: Black Feminist Sonic Dissent Then & Now

a panel discussion with Daphne Brooks, Kara Keeling, & Jacqueline Stewart

November 15, Wednesday
6 pm

Daphne Brooks, African American Studies, Yale University

Kara Keeling, Cinema & Media Studies and American Studies & Ethnicity, University of Southern California, Dornsife

Jacqueline Stewart, Cinema & Media Studies, University of Chicago

Join BCRW in celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Combahee River Collective Statement, the radical Black feminist manifesto completed in 1977 that laid out key tenets of intersectional theory and social justice reform. Taking the works of wide range of artists as our point of departure—from musicians such as the Knowles Sisters and Nina Simone to visual artists like Carrie Mae Weems and the L.A. Rebellion filmmakers—we aim to build a bridge from this historic document to the present and future of Black feminism. Audience participation is key, as we invite all attendees to find new directions in which music and image will allow us to carry forth the manifesto’s cogent wisdom.

Event Oval, The Diana Center
Barnard College
Broadway & 117th St

For more information about this event, please contact the Barnard Center for Research on Women.

Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality, the Barnard College Center for Research on Women, and the Columbia University Institute for Research on Women & Gender Studies.



Nov 10: ASKING FOR IT: A One-Lady Rape about Comedy Starring Her Pussy and Little Else!



adrienne truscottAsking For It: A One-Lady Rape about Comedy Starring Her Pussy and Little Else!

a performance by Adrienne Truscott, & post-show conversation with Ann Pellegrini

November 10, Friday
7:30 pm

Adrienne Truscott, comedian, activist, & performance artist

Tickets start at $35 (student tickets $15) available here.
NYU Comedy Festival Combo pack: Buy 1 Adrienne Truscott and 1 Justin Vivian Bond for $50 (Save 30%)

Skirball Center
60 Washington Square South

For more information about this event, please visit the NYU Skirball Center.

Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality and Skirball Center.



Nov 3: THE RIGHT TO MAIM



right to maimThe Right to Maim

a discussion & celebration of the new book by Jasbir K. Puar with panelists Liat Ben-Moshe, Helga Tawil-Souri, & Hentyle Yapp, with a response by Jasbir Puar

November 3, Friday
5 to 6:30 pm

Liat Ben-Moshe, Disability Studies, University of Toledo

Jasbir Puar, Women’s & Gender Studies, Rutgers

Helga Tawil-Souri, Media, Culture, & Communication, New York University

Hentyle Yapp, Art & Public Policy, New York University

This event celebrates the launch of Jasbir K. Puar’s long-awaited second book, The Right to Maim.  In that book, Puar brings her pathbreaking work on the liberal state, sexuality, and biopolitics to bear on our understanding of disability. Drawing on a stunning array of theoretical and methodological frameworks, Puar uses the concept of “debility”—bodily injury and social exclusion brought on by economic and political factors—to disrupt the category of disability. She shows how debility, disability, and capacity together constitute an assemblage that states use to control populations. Three distinguished scholars–from multiple fields–will discuss The Right to Maim, to be followed by a response by Puar.

Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality
285 Mercer Street, 4th Floor

This event is free & open to the public. Venue is accessible. For more information, please contact NYU CSGS at csgs(at)nyu.edu or 212-992-9540.

Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for Disability Studies; Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality; Department of Art & Public Policy; Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies; and Program in Gender & Sexuality Studies.



Oct 25: INTIMATE RELATIONS: A Genealogy of Queer/Performativity



intimate relationsIntimate Relations: A Genealogy of Queer/Performativity

a lecture by Amelia Jones

October 25, Wednesday
6 to 7:30 pm

Amelia Jones, American Studies & Ethnicity, University of Southern California, Dornsife

This talk is based on the book project Intimate Relations, where Jones traces the interrelated histories of the terms “queer” and “performative” since 1950 in anglophone discourse. This genealogy suggests that the terms have deeply informed not only our thinking about queer, about performance and the performative, and about queer performance, but as well our understanding of how art works and comes to have cultural value (or not) over the past 70 years. In this paper, the focus is on examples in art discourse, where resistances to performance, the performative, and queer sexualities expose the limits of these disciplines’ capacity to address art that moves, takes place over time, and/or foregrounds non-normative sexual identities and identifications—suggesting that these terms are often articulated together in ways that determine how particular kinds of artistic expression are evaluated. Ultimately Jones will point to how the work labelled as queer and/or performative encourages a kind of bodily intimacy or relationality that is deeply threatening to the structures of the art world.

Performance Studies Studio
721 Broadway, room 612

Amelia Jones is the Robert A. Day Professor at the Roski School of Art and Design at University of Southern California. A curator and a theorist and historian of art and performance, her recent publications include Seeing Differently: A History and Theory of Identification and the Visual Arts (2012), Perform Repeat Record: Live Art in History (2012), co-edited with Adrian Heathfield, the edited volume Sexuality (2014), and, co-edited with Erin Silver, Otherwise: Imagining Queer Feminist Art Histories (2016). Her exhibition Material Traces: Time and the Gesture in Contemporary Art took place in 2013 in Montreal. She programmed the events Trans-Montréal (2015) and Live Artists Live (at USC in 2016). She edited “On Trans/Performance,” a special issue of Performance Research (October 2016).

This event is free & open to the public. For more information about this event, please contact the Department of Performance Studies at performance.studies(at)nyu.edu or 212-998-1620.

Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality and Department of Performance Studies.

Image: Ron Athey, Incorruptible Flesh: Dissociative Sparkle, 2006; performed at Artists Space, New York



Oct 18: QUEERING ASIAN AMERICAN CONTEMPORARY ART



queering contemporary asianQueering Asian American Contemporary Art

a forum with Jan Christian Bernabe, Greyson HongLaura Kina, Kyoo Lee, Zavé Martohardjono, & Saya Woolfalk

October 18, Wednesday
6:30 to 8:30 pm

RSVP here.

Queering Contemporary Asian American Art (University of Washington Press, 2017), edited by Laura Kina (DePaul University) and Jan Christian Bernabe (Center of Art and Thought), brings together artists and scholars to challenge normative assumptions, essentialism, and methodologies within the study of Asian American art and visual culture. The featured essays, artist interviews, and artworks  explore the multiple axes of race and identity, queer bodies and forms, kinship and affect, and digital identities and performances.

Kina and Bernabe met at the A/P/A Institute at NYU’s 2012 NEH Summer Institute, “Re-envisioning American Art History: Asian American Art, Research, and Teaching,” which was the genesis for their new book. We are excited to welcome them back to A/P/A alongside contributors Greyson Hong (artist), Kyoo Lee (John Jay College), Zavé Martohardjono (artist), and Saya Woolfalk (artist) to discuss and celebrate the publication.

Asian/Pacific/American Institute
8 Washington Mews

For more information about & to RSVP to this event, please click here.

Presented by the NYU Asian/Pacific/American Institute and co-sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality.



Oct 10: UNCHAIN MY FEET, Sama Alshaibi

Unchain My Feet

a Decolonizing Vision Speaker Series artist talk with Sama Alshaibi

October 10, Tuesday 6 to 8 pm

Sama Alshaibi, Photography/Video Art, University of Arizona

This talk explores the intersections of contemporary migration crises through a selection of Alshaibi’s work. The lecture is informed by Alshaibi’s own biography and considers the impact […]

Sept 26: PISSED

Pissed

a panel & conversation with Cassils, Jack Halberstam, Titus Kaphar, Joel Sanders, & Chase Strangio

September 26, Tuesday 7 to 9 pm

Announcing PISSED, a panel and conversation about art, architecture and legal action as tactics for promoting inclusivity. Held in conjunction with Cassils solo show, Monumental, at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, the […]

** FALL 2017 EVENTS **

** FALL 2017 EVENTS **

Apparatus of Power

Apparatus of Power

a Decolonizing Vision Speaker Series artist talk with Shahzia Sikander

September 25, Monday
6 to 8 pm

CSGS
285 Mercer Street, 4th Floor
NYC

Pissed

pissed

a panel & conversation with Cassils, Jack Halberstam, Titus Kaphar, Joel Sanders, & Chase Strangio

September 26, Tuesday
7 to 9 pm

Performance Studies Studio
721 Broadway, room 612
NYC

Unchain My Feet

unchain my feet

a Decolonizing Vision Speaker Series artist talk with Sama Alshaibi

October 10, Tuesday
6 to 8 pm

CSGS
285 Mercer Street, 4th Floor
NYC