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April 15: Reparative Work in a Paranoid Structure: Vulnerability & Harassment Dynamics



9781584351696Reparative Work in a Paranoid Structure: Vulnerability & Harassment Dynamics

a lecture by Jennifer Doyle

April 15, Friday
3 to 4:30 pm

Jennifer Doyle, English, University of California, Riverside

Victims of workplace harassment and discrimination who don’t lose their jobs are forced to find ways of repairing their relationship to their work. How does one do this, within a paranoid institutional context? Or in a cultural context that pathologizes openness and vulnerability as forms of naïveté? What would it mean to accept harassment as an organic potential of groups, especially within a large organization identified with the reproduction of knowledge and power? Here Jennifer Doyle revisits Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s essay “Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading” in order to bring its ethos to bear upon the ubiquity of harassment. The aim is not to explain where harassment comes from, or to propose solutions to the harassment dynamic. It is, instead, to describe those modes of working-through which are prohibited/rendered unthinkable by contemporary discourse on sex and the workplace (in which one can never be paranoid enough).

Department of Journalism
20 Cooper Square, 7th Floor

Followed immediately by the Annual Forum, in Honor of Muriel Dimen: Danger Talk: Sexual Error, Boundary Crossings, & the Limits of Thought.

Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality and the Department of Performance Studies.


This event is free & open to the public. Venue is wheelchair-accessible.

For more information about this event, contact the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality at csgs(at)nyu.edu or 212-992-9540.

Facebook event page here.



March 23: KEN CORBETT: A Murder Over a Girl: Justice, Gender, Junior High



murder over a girlA Murder Over a Girl: Justice, Gender, Junior High

a book release celebration for and with Ken Corbett

March 23, Wednesday
7:30 to 9:30 pm

Ken Corbett, Postdoctoral Program in Psychoanalysis & Psychotherapy, New York University

Please join us to celebrate the publication of Ken Corbett’s new book: A Murder Over a Girl: Justice Gender, Junior High.

Free & open to the public but REGISTRATION is required.

The New School University Center
63 Fifth Avenue, Starr Foundation Hall

Sponsored by the Sandor Ferenczi Center and the New School for Social Research; co-sponsored by the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy & PsychoanalysisNew York Institute for the Humanities; and Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality.


This event is free & open to the public, but REGISTRATION is required.



April 24: OTHERWISE: Queer Theory into Song



otherwiseOtherwise: Queer Theory into Song

an evening of performance conceived by & featuring Kay Turner, Viva DeConcini, Mary Feaster, & many others

April 24, Sunday
7 to 9 pm

Tickets required — $15 each. Click here to purchase now!

Conceived and curated by Ph.D. Professor Punk Rock Singer, President Of The American Folkloric Society, and General BadAss Kay Turner. Turner expertly culls lyrics from impenetrable-to-most Academic Texts and sets them to new original music with the help of Viva DeConcini, Mary Feaster and many special guests.

Joe’s Pub
425 Lafayette Street

Sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality.



April 15: Danger Talk: Sexual Error, Boundary Crossings, & the Limits of Thought, annual forum in Honor of Muriel Dimen



16322477039_89c2840a9d_zDanger Talk: Sexual Error, Boundary Crossings, & the Limits of Thought

an Annual Forum between the Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality and Studies in Gender & Sexuality, in honor of Muriel Dimen

Confirmed speakers include Anne DaileyJoseph FischelUmmni Khan, Kimberlyn Leary, & Charles Levin

April 15, Friday
4:45 to 7:30 pm

Anne Dailey, School of Law, University of Connecticut

Joseph Fischel, Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies, Yale University

Ummni Khan, Law & Legal Studies, Carleton University, Canada

Kimberlyn Leary, Psychiatry, Harvard University; Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow; and Senior Affiliated Researcher, Anna Julia Cooper Center, Wake Forest University

Charles Levin, Canadian Institute of Psycho-analysis; Editor-in-chief, Revue Canadienne de Psychanalyse/Canadian Journal of Psychoanalysis

This forum brings together clinicians, legal theorists, scholars of gender and sexuality studies, and policy practitioners to discuss the multiple ways “sexual danger” is being discussed, administered, and policed in a variety of settings: from campus debates over sexual assault and affirmative consent to conflicts roiling psychoanalytic institutes over sexual boundary violations between analysts and patients.

This forum is the 7th annual collaboration between CSGS and the journal Studies in Gender and Sexuality. As with the previous such events, this year’s was co-curated by Ann Pellegrini for CSGS and Muriel Dimen for SGS. Muriel Dimen’s ground-breaking writings on sexual boundary violations in the analytic space specifically inspired this year’s focus. But a more general goal of these annual gatherings is to spark on-going conversation and exchange between clinicians and cultural theorists of gender and sexuality to see how we might learn from each other and transform the institutional spaces we occupy.

That spark continues, and so does Muriel Dimen’s. We dedicate this day of conversation to her memory.

Department of Journalism
20 Cooper Square, 7th Floor

Preceded immediately by Reparative Work in a Paranoid Structure: Vulnerability & Harassment Dynamics, a lecture by Jennifer Doyle at 3 pm.

Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality and Studies in Gender & Sexuality.


This event is free & open to the public. Venue is wheelchair-accessible.

For more information about this event, contact the Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality at csgs(at)nyu.edu or 212-992-9540.

Facebook event page here.


April 7: ‘An Eight Day Passage’: Performance Art, Endurance, & Men



Exhibition-Poster-Terry-Trengove-An-Eight-Day-Passage-1977‘An Eight Day Passage’: Performance Art, Endurance, & Men

a lecture by Dominic Johnson

April 7, Thursday
6:30 to 8 pm

Dominic Johnson, English & Drama, Queen Mary University of London, and CSGS Visiting Scholar, New York University

‘On the morning of the 25th October 1977 I shall be incarcerated within the confines of a concrete cell and the entrance sealed behind me […]. [My] task within the eight day duration of this work will be to attempt to free myself from the isolation of these chosen limits of time and space.’ So reads in part a statement of intent by the late British artist Kerry Trengove, ahead of his endurance performance An Eight Day Passage (1977), in which he dug his way out of a gallery, through foundations and walls. The action received extensive coverage in the national press, and was iconic among fellow artists and their audiences, yet it has since slipped into obscurity. In this lecture, Johnson “recovers” the action and situates it in relation to better-known works of durational endurance in the period, in order to ask critical questions about political, class and masculine struggle in the 1970s.

Performance Studies Studio
721 Broadway, 6th Floor

Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality and Department of Performance Studies.


This event is free & open to the public. Venue is wheelchair-accessible.

For more information about this event, contact the Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality at csgs(at)nyu.edu or 212-992-9540.

Facebook event page here.



March 25: Beyond Normal: The Fantasy Bodies of National Culture



beyond normalBeyond Normal: The Fantasy Bodies of National Culture

a panel with andrè carrington, Julie Elman, & Ramzi Fawaz

March 25, Friday
10 am to 5 pm

andrè carrington, English & Philosophy, Drexel University and author of Speculative Blackness

Julie Elman, Women’s & Gender Studies, University of Missouri and author of Chronic Youth

Ramzi Fawaz, English, University of Wisconsin, Madison and author of The New Mutants

How do popular culture and mass media shape our notions of what it means to be healthy, happy, safe, and human? And how might imaginative genres like fantasy and speculative fiction break the mold of the “normal life”? This symposium brings together three scholars working at the intersections of critical race, disability, and gender and sexuality studies to consider how the misfit, freak, speculative, and mutant bodies of American culture are variously contained or authorized by different twentieth century and contemporary media and social forms, exploring genres and affective modes like fantasy, speculative fiction, and enchantment.

10 am
Coffee Service and Welcome

10:10 to 11:30 am
Julie Passanante Elman, University of Missouri
Author of Chronic Youth
Discussant: Lisa Duggan, New York University

11:45 am to 1 pm
Ramzi Fawaz, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Author of The New Mutants
Discussant: Phillip Brian Harper, New York University

Lunch Break

2:15 to 3:30 pm
andré carrington, Drexel University
Author of Speculative Blackness
Discussant: Heather Masri, New York University

3:45 to 5 pm
Roundtable Discussion

5 pm
Reception

Social & Cultural Analysis
20 Cooper Square, 4th Floor

Co-sponsored by the NYU Department of Social & Cultural Analysis (American Studies Program; Gender & Sexuality Studies Program); Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality; Asian/Pacific/American Institute; Department of English; and NYU Press.


This event is free & open to the public. Venue is wheelchair-accessible.

For more information about this event, contact the NYU Department of Social & Cultural Analysis at 212-992-9650.

Facebook event page here.



March 3: The Present & Future of LGBT Political Identity



present future lgbtThe Present & Future of LGBT Political Identity

a lecture by Patrick Egan with discussant Leonie Huddy

March 3, Thursday
6:30 to 8 pm

Patrick J. Egan, Politics, New York University

Leonie Huddy, Political Science, SUNY Stony Brook

The U.S. Supreme Court’s extension of the right to marry to all 50 states caps a remarkable transformation in law and policy with regard to gay rights, as well as a change in Americans’ attitudes about lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people whose speed is without parallel in recent American history. In this sense, LGBT people are following a path tread by many minority groups as they’ve moved away from stigma and discrimination toward de jure equality and assimilation. What does this mean for their politics? LGBTs are currently among the most loyal members of the liberal Democratic coalition in the United States. Will this cohesiveness persist, or will gay people’s political identity become less distinctive over time?

Department of Politics
19 West 4th Street, 2nd Floor, Room 217

Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality and the Department of Politics.


This event is free & open to the public. Venue is wheelchair-accessible.

For more information about this event, contact the Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality at csgs(at)nyu.edu or 212-992-9540.

Facebook event page here.



2016 CSGS Global Visiting Scholar: Dominic Johnson

dominic johnsonDominic Johnson is a Senior Lecturer in the School of English and Drama, at Queen Mary, University of London. He is the author of Glorious Catastrophe: Jack Smith, Performance and Visual Culture (2012); Theatre & the Visual (2012); and most recently, The Art of Living: An Oral History of Performance Art (2015). He is the editor of four books, including most recently Pleading in the Blood: The Art and Performances of Ron Athey (2013) and Critical Live Art: Contemporary Histories of Performance in the UK (2012). It’s All Allowed: The Performances of Adrian Howells (with Deirdre Heddon) is forthcoming in 2016. He is currently an Editor of the journal Contemporary Theatre Review (with Maria Delgado and Maggie Gale). In 2014, he was awarded the annual early-career prize for research excellence from the UK’s Theatre and Performance Research Association (TaPRA). From 2005 to 2012, his frequently bloody performances (solo and in collaboration with Ron Athey) were shown around the world, including at festivals of performance and live art in Copenhagen, Ljubljana, Rome, Toronto, Vienna, Zagreb, and elsewhere, and throughout the United Kingdom, including most notably at the National Portrait Gallery in London as part of ‘Gay Icons’.


For a list of past Visiting Scholars, click here.



February 10: Codependent Lesbian Space Alien Seeks Same film screening

Codependent Lesbian Space Alien Seeks Same (76 min., 2012, Dir. Madeleine Olnek)

a film screening & discussion with Madeleine Olnek & Laura Terruso

February 10, Wednesday 6 to 8 pm

Madeleine Olnek, director & writer

Laura Terruso, producer

The adventures of lesbian space aliens on the planet Earth, and the story of the romance […]

February 5: Welcome to This House film screening with Barbara Hammer

Welcome to This House (79 min., 2015, Dir. Barbara Hammer)

a film screening & discussion with Barbara Hammer & Barbara Browning

February 5, Friday 6 to 8 pm

Barbara Hammer, visual artist & filmmaker

Barbara Browning, Performance Studies, New York University

Welcome To This House (2015) is a feature documentary film on the homes […]

* STAY TUNED FOR FALL 2016 EVENTS *