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CSGS Visiting Scholar: Kane Race

CSGS Visiting Scholar: fall 2011

Kane RaceKane Race

Kane Race is a Senior Lecturer in Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney. He received his PhD in Health, Sexuality & Culture from the University of New South Wales in 2004, where he was based at the National Centre in HIV Social Research. His work has explored embodied engagements with medicine in several different contexts and cultures of consumption: HIV/AIDS among gay and homosexually active men; drug use (both licit and illicit); and more recently, markets in bottled water. He is the author of Pleasure Consuming Medicine: The Queer Politics of Drugs (Duke University Press, 2009), and Plastic Water (with Gay Hawkins and Emily Potter, under contract, MIT Press). He has published a number of articles which have explored impact of HIV antiretroviral therapies and other technologies on gay cultural, sexual and social scientific practices since 1996.

Current research:

In his current research, Kane is investigating the operation of various framing devices in the field of HIV/AIDS and drug policy. He is interested in how responsibility for HIV transmission and drug effects are framed by institutions such as the criminal law, randomized control trials, and experimental practices, and he draws on theories of performativity – as elaborated in gender studies, science studies and economic sociology – in order to recast the materialization of health effects in ways that seek to expand our modes of attentiveness to the dangers and pleasures associated with sex and drugs beyond the actions of the individual human subject. He is interested in the generation of affective climates that make care practices more possible among stigmatized groups. As part of this project, he is investigating the limits of current modes of accounting for drug harm and HIV transmission.


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