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“I am what time, circumstance, history, have made of me, certainly, but I am also, much more than that. So are we all.” -James Baldwin
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Historicizing Erotohistoriography: A Lecture by Elizabeth Freeman

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELED. WE HOPE TO RESCHEDULE FOR SOMETIME NEXT YEAR.

Elizabeth Freeman, English, UC Davis

Developmentalist accounts of psychological and bodily becoming plot the “growth” and “maturation” of both individual subjects and populations in ways that reduce what counts as a viable social formation or a livable life. Taking issue with the straightjacket of this way of telling time, Elizabeth Freeman instead argues for an “erotohistoriography”: to wit, a politics of unpredictable, deeply embodied pleasures that might counter the neo-liberal demand to narrate time in one direction only. This talk is part of a larger book project that seeks to offer a revised history of sexuality by centering queer pleasures and proposing the body as site of historical encounter–in and across time. Through these encounters across time, we might get a glimpse of historically specific pleasures and ways of organizing a life that exceed the current cramped politics of same-sex marriage as end game of sexual liberation.

Elizabeth Freeman is Associate Professor of English at University of California, Davis. She began her teaching career at Sarah Lawrence College, joining the faculty of UC Davis in 2000. She specializes in American literature and gender/sexuality/queer studies, and her articles have appeared in numerous scholarly journals. Her first book was entitled The Wedding Complex: Forms of Belonging in Modern American Culture (Duke UP, 2002). A new book, Time Binds: Queer Temporalities, Queer Histories, is forthcoming from Duke University Press. She also edited a special double issue of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies on the topic of “Queer Temporalities.”

Co-sponsored by NYU’s Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality; Department of Performance Studies; Department of English; and Gender and Sexuality Studies Program; and by the Barnard Center for Research on Women, Barnard College.

For more information, please call 212-992-9540 or email csgs@nyu.edu.

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*** SPRING 2018 EVENTS ***

CSGS spring 2018 calendar

Third Annual José E. Muñoz Memorial Lecture by JUDITH BUTLER

judith butler

a lecture on Susceptibility\Solidarity

February 12, Monday
6:30 to 8 pm

tickets required

Skirball Center
566 LaGuardia Place
NYC

The Next American Revolution: Publishing Protest with American Studies Now

next american revolution

a series launch with Lisa Duggan, Roderick Ferguson, Jack Halberstam, & LaMonda Horton-Stallings

February 15, Thursday
6 to 8 pm

CSGS
285 Mercer Street, 4th Floor
NYC

The Extractive Zone: The Social Ecologies of Cecilia Vicuña

extracive zone

a Decolonizing Vision Speaker Series lecture by Macarena Gómez-Barris

February 22, Thursday
6 to 8 pm

CSGS
285 Mercer Street, 4th Floor
NYC